UPDATE: N-Map and CEJIL Launch Uruguay Campaign: Nunca Más Qué?

(para español, ven abajo)

UPDATE: Just in and available for viewing is Romper el Muro de la Impunidad (Breaking Down the Wall of Impunity). This is the extended video (11 minutes) that N-Map and CEJIL are launching as part of their campaign to overcome the barriers to truth and justice in Uruguay. It includes interviews with leading politicians, academics, journalists, family members and victims themselves.

The video was shot a year ago–in March 2012–around President Mujica’s public acknowledgement of state responsibility for grave crimes against its citizens during  period of military rule from 1973 – 1985.  With your help, we can keep the momentum alive and let Uruguayans and their leaders know that impunity, and lack of knowledge about a society’s past, is an impediment for the future and violates the state’s responsibility to ensure the human rights of its citizens.

Already, Nunca Más Qué?, the campaign centered around both the long and short video, will continue with an in-person event in Montevideo next month.  More information will be forthcoming. For now, please watch the video, share it, and spread the word!
  • Follow #NuncaMasQue
  • Like the ¿Nunca Más Qué? Facebook page and stay involved in the ongoing advocacy efforts at  www.fb.com/nuncamasque
  • Share the video with your friends and networks on Twitter and Facebook
  • Email or show the video to your friends and family
  • Write your representative and President Mujica about the need to reopen cases related to dictatorship crimes to bring truth and justice to Uruguay. Essentially ask them “Nunca MMás Qué?”
  • Attend Uruguay’s launch of the videos to commemorate a year since the state acknowledgement of responsibility to the people of Uruguay on April 3.
  • Translate the video into another language (We already have it in English, Spanish, and Portuguese!)
  • Send us your thoughts at nuncamasque@newmediaadvocacy.org
For our Spanish speaking friends:
  • See the joint CEJIL/N-Map press release
  • Listen to CEJIL’s Program Director for Bolivia and the Southern Cone, Liliana Tojo’s  interview on Radio Uruguay

_________________________________

Sandra Pelúa was in grade school before she first found out her biological father had been disappeared by the Uruguayan military during the nation’s dictatorship from 1973-1985. Unaware that her mother’s husband was not her father, it was not until she first entered grade school that she recognized her surname was different from her siblings’, while all her friends with brothers and sisters had the same name. That was when Sandra first learned who her real father was.

Sandra never knew this man though. Her family, constrained by the silence enveloping Uruguayan society following the dictatorship, never spoke openly about him or his disappearance. Instead, the trauma of the past remained an unspoken reality and haunted her family’s interactions as they struggled to create a new life in a country that had the highest rate of political incarceration in the world.  

Knowing that she cannot change her own upbringing, which was tacitly but consistently affected by impunity and a culture of silence, Sandra looks towards the future of Uruguay as the best hope for overcoming the difficulty of her own past. Sandra believes in promoting justice and truth about Uruguay’s past, not only for herself and the father she never knew, but also because she believes that her son “has a right to know that he has a future, but mainly that he also has a past, a history.”

The New Media Advocacy Project (N-Map) and the Center for Justice and International Law (CEJIL) produced two videos to highlight Sandra’s story, and those of many others like her, to advocate for reopening cases related to crimes committed under the military dictatorship and justice for families of the disappeared, as well as victims of torture and rape. While the crimes committed during the dictatorship occurred over thirty years ago, the abuses that so many Uruguayans suffered are still not only present to them, but important for all citizens in the country – to their history, and also to their understanding of the future hopes for democracy and the possibility of justice and rule of law in Uruguay. The first video called Breaking Down the Wall of Impunity is an 11-minute piece, which provides an analysis of the barriers to truth and justice in Uruguay. It includes interviews with leading politicians, academics, journalists, family members and victims themselves. The shorter 2.5-minute video called Never Again, What? seeks to act as a platform for change by engaging all Uruguayan citizens about the relevance and important of justice. It is intended for social media, television, and radio distribution. Together, the videos are part of a comprehensive strategy for helping to implement human rights guarantees for victims and their right to justice.

Despite an ever-increasing group of voices like Sandra’s, impunity continues to be entrenched in the small Southern Cone nation. Many Uruguayans do not have access to records to learn about their past, and most perpetrators are protected by an amnesty law, which states that they cannot be tried for crimes committed during the nation’s military rule, and which conflicts with Uruguay’s international legal obligations.

Within the past few weeks, two disturbing events occurred that reinforce the continued challenges Uruguay faces in their fight to achieve justice. First, judge Mariana Mota, who had long fought for holding military leaders accountable for crimes committed by the military dictatorship, was transferred from her criminal post to a civilian jurisdiction without any explanation, just as trials were slated to begin. Days later, the Uruguayan Supreme Court ruled that the dictatorship crimes could not be considered crimes against humanity and that the time within which to prosecute has expired. The ruling effectively means that most gross human rights violations committed under the dictatorship will go unpunished.

These two events created uproar in the nation, particularly because just two years ago an important decision came down from the Inter-American Court for Human Rights (IAHCR), calling for the reopening of trials and investigations into past abuses. While international pressure is combining with local protest movements to mount a social challenge against impunity in Uruguay, the local amnesty law from 1986 still stands, contradicting these international rulings. While the Court’s decision is binding, local judges need to know that there is public support for reopening investigations into the nation’s history and establishing the truth about this dark period in the past—for both the victims and their families, but also for the rest of the nation. With growing attention to these issues, stemming from the recent judge transfer and Supreme Court ruling, there is now an opportunity to demonstrate that these crimes must be punished once and for all. Over twenty-five years later, impunity needs to become a part of the nation’s past, not its future.

We need your help to do this. So what can you do?  Join Sandra, Valentin and many others, who the IACHR case was litigated on behalf of, in speaking out for justice in Uruguay.

  • Follow #NuncaMasQue
  • Like the ¿Nunca Más Qué? Facebook page and stay involved in the ongoing advocacy efforts
  • Share the video with your friends and networks on Twitter and Facebook
  • Email or show the video to your friends and family
  • Write your representative and President Mujica about the need to reopen cases related to dictatorship crimes to bring truth and justice to Uruguay. Essentially ask them “Nunca MMás Qué?”
  • Attend Uruguay’s launch of the videos to commemorate a year since the state acknowledgement of responsibility to the people of Uruguay on April 3.
  • Translate the video into another language (We already have it in English, Spanish, and Portuguese!)
  • Send us your thoughts at nuncamasque@newmediaadvocacy.org
 _______
11 de Marzo 2013
Sandra Pelúa cursaba la escuela cuando descubrió que los militares habían desaparecido a su padre durante el régimen de la dictadura que azotó a Uruguay desde 1973 a 1985. Ignoraba que el compañero de su madre no era su padre biológico, hasta que tuvo conciencia que su apellido era distinto al de sus hermanas y hermanos.

Sandra nunca conoció a su padre. Su familia, oprimida por el silencio que envolvía a la sociedad uruguaya luego de la dictadura, nunca habló ni de él ni de su desaparición abiertamente. El trauma del pasado quedó como una realidad secreta que les atormentó mientras construían una nueva vida. Uruguay tuvo en aquella época la tasa de encarcelamientos políticos más alta del mundo.

Con conciencia de que no podía cambiar su crianza (la cual se vio afectada por la impunidad y la cultura de silencio), Sandra alberga aún la esperanza de promover la justicia y la verdad, no solo por ella y el padre que nunca conoció, sino también porque cree que su hijo “tiene el derecho de saber que tiene un futuro, pero que  también tiene un pasado, y una historia”.

El Proyecto de Defensa en los Nuevos Medios (N-Map) y el Centro por la Justicia y el Derecho Internacional (CEJIL) han realizado en conjunto dos videos para dar a conocer la historia de Sandra y la de muchas otras personas  como ella. Ambos trabajos buscan contribuir a que se reabran los casos relacionados con los crímenes de la dictadura militar y se obtenga justicia y verdad para las familias de los desaparecidos, y para las víctimas de tortura y violencia sexual.

Los crímenes cometidos durante la dictadura ocurrieron hace más de 30 años, pero los abusos sufridos siguen en la memoria de las víctimas, y son importantes para todos los y las uruguayos/as, para su historia, para su entendimiento del futuro y de la democracia y  para la posibilidad de que se haga justicia y se respete el Estado de derecho en Uruguay.

El primer video, titulado “¿Nunca más qué?” (2´27) busca, por medio de testimonios de familiares  y víctimas, sensibilizar a las y los uruguayos respecto a la relevancia e importancia de alcanzar la justicia.

El segundo video llamado “Romper el Muro de la Impunidad” (11´00) ofrece además un análisis de los obstáculos a la justicia y verdad en el Uruguay de hoy e incluye entrevistas con políticos, académicos, periodistas también.

Los videos serán difundidos en la televisión y radio uruguayas y en redes sociales; y pretenden fomentar la aplicación de las garantías de derechos humanos para las víctimas y su derecho a la verdad y la justicia.

La impunidad aún continúa en Uruguay, incluso cuando voces como la de Sandra se escuchan con frecuencia. Muchas y muchos uruguayos no tienen real acceso a los archivos que les permitirían conocer su pasado. Muchos de los perpetradores de la época están aún protegidos por la Ley de Caducidad, que estipula que no pueden ser procesados por crímenes cometidos durante la dictadura, lo que ha creado un conflicto con las obligaciones legales internacionales del país.

Durante las últimas semanas, ocurrieron dos acontecimientos que dejaron en manifiesto la lucha sostenida que se mantiene en Uruguay por defender la justicia.

La Jueza Mariana Mota (quien ha luchado incansablemente para que los líderes militares sean imputados  por los delitos cometidos durante la dictadura) fue trasladada de la órbita penal a la civil sin explicación y justo cuando se iban a iniciar varios juicios. Días después, la Suprema Corte de Justicia de Uruguay falló una ley que dictaba que los crímenes de la dictadura no podían ser considerados crímenes de lesa humanidad y que el plazo para procesar a los culpables había vencido. En la práctica esta ley significa que la mayoría de las grandes violaciones de derechos humanos cometidos durante la dictadura quedarán impunes.

Estos hechos causaron una indignación generalizada, en particular porque hace apenas dos años la Corte Interamericana de Derechos Humanos (Corte IDH) se pronunció a favor de abrir e investigar una vez más todos los casos de abusos efectuados en el pasado. Si bien la presión internacional se une a las protestas de los movimientos locales, a efectos de poder desafiar la impunidad en el país, la Ley de Caducidad de 1986 aún tiene vigencia y contradice todas las leyes internacionales.

La decisión de la Suprema Corte uruguaya tiene validez legal, pero los jueces locales deben saber que cuentan con el apoyo popular para volver a abrir investigaciones y revelar qué ocurrió realmente en aquellos años de oscuridad.

Esto debe ser realizado no solo para las víctimas y sus familias, sino también para el resto del pueblo uruguayo. Con base en dichas consideraciones (y teniendo en cuenta el reciente traslado de la Jueza Mota y el fallo de la Suprema Corte de Justicia),  existe una oportunidad para demostrar que estos crímenes deben ser sancionados de una vez por todas. Después de más de treinta años, la impunidad tiene que convertirse en parte del pasado.

Ahora necesitamos tu ayuda.

  • Únete a Sandra, Valentín y muchos otros a favor de la justicia en Uruguay.
  • Sigue #NuncaMasQue en Twitter.
  • Dale “Me Gusta” a la página en Facebook de ¿Nunca Más Qué? E involúcrate en las actividades.
  • Comparte el video con tus contactos en Twitter y Facebook.
  • Envía el video por correo electrónico a parientes y amigos.
  • Escríbele a tus representantes y al Presidente José Mujica sobre la necesidad de reabrir los casos relacionados a crímenes de la dictadura y llevar verdad y justicia a Uruguay. Especialmente pregúntales: “¿Nunca más Qué?”
  • Asiste al lanzamiento oficial del video en Montevideo el 3 de abril para conmemorar el primer año desde que el Estado asumió su responsabilidad frente a los uruguayos.
  • Traduce el video a otros idiomas (ya lo tenemos en inglés, español y portugués)
  • Envíanos tus comentarios e ideas a nuncamasque@newmediaadvocacy.org

One thought on “UPDATE: N-Map and CEJIL Launch Uruguay Campaign: Nunca Más Qué?

  1. He leido UPDATE: N-Map and CEJIL Launch Uruguay Campaign: Nunca Más Qué? | New Media Advocacy con mucho interes y me ha parecido interesente ademas de claro en su contenido. No dejeis de cuidar este blog es bueno.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s